Mingyang Song

Mingyang Song

Assistant Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Nutrition
Departments of Epidemiology and of Nutrition
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Mingyang Song Photo

Mingyang Song received his medical degree from Shandong University in China in 2008, and then went on to receive formal training in epidemiology, earning a Master’s in Epidemiology in 2011 from Peking University, a Master’s in Biostatistics in 2014 from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and a joint doctoral degree in Nutrition and Epidemiology in 2015 from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 

Song’s research focuses on clinical and nutritional epidemiology of cancer. Specifically, his work integrates large-scale observational studies with biomarker-based randomized clinical trials to identify novel nutritional and gut microbiota-targeted strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. Much of his work has been based on three large prospective cohort studies, the Nurses’ Health Study I and II, and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, in which diet, lifestyle and cancer diagnosis and death have been assessed over decades with blood, stool, and tumor tissue specimens collected in a subset of participants. Building on the observational findings, Song is leading two clinical trials at Massachusetts General Hospital to investigate the benefit of omega-3 fatty acid treatment for colon cancer, and explore the potential for future clinical translation. He is also a co-investigator of the MICRObiome Among Nurses (MICRO-N) Study, a large prospective microbiome study of 25,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II, and a member of the Cancer Epidemiology and Gastrointestinal Malignancies Programs at Dana-Farber / Harvard Cancer Center.

Song’s research is supported by several grants, including a K99/R00 grant by the National Cancer Institute and a Mentored Research Scholar Grant from the American Cancer Society. The findings of his research have been published in leading journals in oncology and general medicine, including JAMA Oncology, JAMA Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology. In recognition of his excellence in research, he was awarded the prestigious NextGen Star Award by the American Association for Cancer Research in 2017.